How to Translate a WordPress Theme Quickly?


How to Translate a WordPress Theme Quickly?
Bess Negron

At this point, you have to choose the language in which you will translate the theme. Here, you have two options to choose the language. You can either choose from a list of the common languages or provide the language code in the box below. Once you have chosen the language, click the “Start translating” button. You should be taken to a page like the following –

How to Translate WordPress Themes Quickly?
Loyce Nabors

Have you ever thought of translating your site into your own language? I am not talking about the front-end translation, but the back-end translation of your admin area. It’s good to have the dashboard in your language, right?

Offer a translated WordPress theme with this in-depth tutorial
Retha Poston

If you’re used to working in HTML or through the WordPress editors then there are a few areas which might catch you out when creating the translations; here’s a few tips to help you get things done: First of all, any localizations should use UTF-8 encoding. This is one of the reasons we recommend Poedit; this kind of seemingly minor issue is already accounted for in a dedicated program. If you were to edit the files via a standard, simple editor like notepad, then the default settings will usually use different encoding. You won’t actually notice this when working on the file, but once you save it you’ll notice that all your translated elements are displaying the identifying string rather than the original or new language. You can just open and resave the file with the proper encoding, but using a dedicated program will prevent this happening in the first place, so it’s probably the safer solution! When writing your translations you should write your translations plainly; that is, avoid escaping accented and special characters with HTML character entities, save for a select group that are expected to be escaped to avoid conflict with XHTML markup: angle brackets (< & >), and ampersands (&). In addition, there are a few other characters that function better when escaped, such as non-breaking spaces ( ), angle quotes (« and »), curly apostrophes (’) and curly quotes. When we create multilingual sites, we need to remember that translation is not everything; localization goes beyond just translating words and expands to include adapting the site to a different language, country and conventions. Some words simply don’t mean the same thing or carry the same implications as other languages, so don’t translate literally; translate organically; try to get a feel for the meaning behind the original text, and capture that spirit in your translation.

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